W3BE'S BE Informed!
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BE Informed No. 1.8.2

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Station Identification Announcements

by

Reciprocal Privileged Stations

In Places Where the FCC Regulates Our Amateur Service

John B. Johnston W3BE

Q. How must station identification be announced whilst my station is transmitting in the U.S. under the reciprocal privileges authorized by your Section 97.107?

A. At places where the FCC regulates our amateur service, Section 97.119 station identification announcements must be transmitted on the transmitting channel at the end of each communication, and at least every 10 minutes during a communication, for the purpose of clearly making the source of the transmissions from the station known to those receiving the transmissions. No station may transmit unidentified communications or signals, or transmit as the station call sign, any call sign not authorized to the station.

  Section 97.119(g), moreover, says that when the station is transmitting under the authority of §97.107 of this part, an indicator consisting of the appropriate letter-numeral designating the station location must be included before the call sign that was issued to the station by the country granting the license. For an amateur service license granted by the Government of Canada, however, the indicator must be included after the call sign. At least once during each intercommunication, the identification announcement must include the geographical location as nearly as possible by city and state, commonwealth or possession.

   The station indicators are also listed on the FCC webpage. It says:

   When a station is transmitting under the privileges afforded by an amateur service license granted by the Government of Canada or an amateur service license granted by any other country with which the United States has a multilateral or bilateral agreement, an indicator consisting of the appropriate letter-numeral designating the station location must be included in the station identification announcement. See 47 C.F.R. § 97.119

   This indicator must be separated from the assigned call sign by the slant mark (/) or any suitable word that denotes the slant mark. When the station is transmitting under the authority of an amateur service license granted by the Government of Canada, the indicator must be included after the call sign (example: "VE3XX/W4").

   When the station is transmitting under the authority of an amateur service license granted by any other country with which the United States has a multilateral or bilateral agreement, the indicator must be included before the call sign (example: "W4/IB4DX). At least once during each intercommunication ("QSO"), the identification announcement must also include the general geographical location as nearly as possible by city and state, commonwealth or possession (example: "W3/IB4DX Kent Island, Maryland " or "VE3XX/W4 Wallops Island, Virginia").

   The station location letter-numeral indicators are: Alabama W4; Alaska KL7; American Samoa KH8; Arizona W7; Arkansas W5; Baker Island KH1; California W6; Colorado W0; Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands KH0; Commonwealth of Puerto Rico KP4; Connecticut W1; Delaware W3; Desecheo Island, PR KP5; District of Columbia W3; Florida W4; Georgia W4; Guam KH2; Hawaii KH6; Howland Island KH1; Idaho W7; Illinois W9; Indiana W9; Iowa W0; Jarvis Island KH5; Johnston Island KH3; Kansas W0; Kentucky W4; Kingman Reef KH5K; Kure Island, HI KH7; Louisiana W5; Maine W1; Maryland W3; Massachusetts W1; Michigan W8; Midway Island KH4; Minnesota W0; Mississippi W5; Missouri W0; Montana W7; Navassa Island KP1; Nebraska W0; Nevada W7; New Hampshire W1; New Jersey W2; New Mexico W5; New York W2; North Carolina W4; North Dakota W0;Ohio W8; Oklahoma W5; Oregon W7; Palmyra Island KH5; Peale Island KH9; Pennsylvania W3; Rhode Island W1; South Carolina W4; South Dakota W0;Tennessee W4; Texas W5; Utah W7; Vermont W1; Virgin Islands KP2; Virginia W4; Wake Island KH9; Washington W7; West Virginia W8; Wilkes Island KH9; Wisconsin W9; Wyoming W7.

   The FCC does not have or provide information on the specific requirements for reciprocal operation in foreign countries. FCC-licensed amateur operators should make their arrangements with the appropriate governmental agency in the foreign country.

Q. Why must the indicator for a Canadian reciprocal station follow the call sign while an amateur service license granted by other countries must be before the call sign?

A. The reciprocal arrangement with Canada apparently extends into that degree of specificity; the arrangements with other countries obviously do not. 

Q. I am Amateur Extra Class operator, K5**. When my ham lady friend G3*** visits from Great Britain, can she operate reciprocally my station using my FCC-assigned call sign?

A. Yes, Great Britain is one of our Section 97.107 reciprocal countries. But, there are two inconsistencies you should understand. Firstly, where SEC. 303(l)(3) of the Communications Act gives the FCC the power to issue authorizations to permit an alien licensed by his government as an amateur radio operator to operate his amateur station licensed by his government in the U.S. (more text), you must assume that statement is simply worded in passé language not intended to exclude anyone because of gender. 

   Secondly, as to the statute’s limitation on operating his amateur station licensed by his government, you must assume that Section 97.107 otherwise allows you to designate your alien visitor as the Section 97.103 control operator of your station.  It says in pertinent part: 

   A non-citizen of the United States (“alien”) holding an amateur service authorization granted by the alien's government is authorized to be the control operator of an amateur station located at places where the amateur service is regulated by the FCC.      

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June 23, 2016

Supersedes all prior editions